An offer by QCDFVR to raise awareness during Sexual Violence Awareness Month

During Sexual Violence Awareness Month, QCDFVR would like to promote our special edition of ‘Myths and Facts’ cards about sexual assault. The cards, written in plain English, were developed with, and for, practitioners and trainers to use as a tool in their work. A recent review has shown that this simple card set is also beneficial for use by a broader audience, such as friends and family and in workplaces to dispel myths as a preventative tool. At the same time, the cards remain a useful resource for a broad range of workers in initiating or having discussions with those impacted by sexual assault.

We would like to spread the facts about sexual assault and dispel the myths far and wide. So, we are extending an offer for agencies, workplaces and service providers to order the ‘Myths and Facts’ cards which will be delivered to your door to extend awareness about sexual assault. 

Order printed copies
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Practice Tools

These factsheets may be downloaded, or you can call us to discuss your print options.

Key messages for practice

The key messages in this fact sheet have been drawn from the Practice Paper: Prevention, Early Intervention and Support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People who have Experienced Sexual Violence.

Practice Paper: Prevention, Early Intervention and Support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People who have Experienced Sexual Violence

Based on available literature, this Paper informs best practice in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People who have Experienced Sexual Violence.

Integrated Services Responses: A Measurement tool for communities

This survey tool has been designed to help individual communities monitor and enhance the progress of integrated responses to domestic and family violence . A Word document version is available on request.

Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault – Myths and Facts

Fact Sheet

This fact sheet is designed for use by practitioners and trainers to debunk myths around sexual assault, based on the community attitudes and understandings expressed in the 2017 National Community Attitudes towards Violence Against Women Survey research report.

General

Domestic Violence – Myth and Facts

This fact sheet is designed for use by practitioners and trainers to debunk myths around domestic violence, based on the community attitudes and understandings expressed in the 2017 National Community Attitudes towards Violence Against Women Survey research report.

Fact Sheet for Women

This fact sheet is designed to answer questions women frequently ask when they are considering action to take in response to domestic violence (specifically, intimate partner abuse). It is designed to allay fears women may have about attending a domestic violence service by explaining what domestic violence services will and won’t do, and also to help women who may not recall responses to all their questions when they do attend a service.

Respectful Relationships

This fact sheet about non-physical abuse was produced following research on intimate partner abuse in the Bowen Basin and Mackay region of Central Queensland. This fact sheet provides women with the opportunity to self assess their relationship; it affirms that non-physical abuse has serious effects and that women experiencing such abuse should seek help.

Orders & Breaches

Applying for a DVO

Going to Court

Respondent Information

Understanding a DVO

Orders and Breaches

The Orders and Breaches fact sheet provides responses to frequently asked questions regarding the nature of, and processes associated with, domestic violence orders (DVOs). It has been developed in consultation with a range of stakeholders and is a useful summary of key DVO issues.

Indigenous

Strong Women, Hard Yarns

This booklet is designed for three different age groups of women. It contains real life stories of ATSI women’s experiences of abuse, tips and information about how to access support. (As it is a 32-page colour booklet, you may want to contact us regarding print options.)

Babies & Toddlers

The Babies & Toddlers fact sheet provides mothers and pregnant women with information about the effects of domestic and family violence on babies and toddlers.

Children 4 – 12

The Children 4-12 fact sheet provides mothers with an insight into what their children may be thinking and feeling if they are exposed to domestic and family violence.

Young People

The Young People fact sheet provides mothers with an insight into what young people in their family may be thinking and feeling if they are exposed to domestic and family violence.

Babies and Toddlers

Babies and Toddlers

Everyday Version

This is a condensed, plain English version of the Babies and Toddlers fact sheet. It provides mothers and pregnant women with information about the effects of domestic and family violence on babies and toddlers.

Children 4 – 12

Children 4 – 12

Everyday Version

This is a condensed, plain English version of the Children 4-12 fact sheet. It provides mothers with an insight into what their children may be thinking and feeling; and how their behaviour may be affected, if they are exposed to domestic and family violence.

Young People

Young People

Everyday Version

This is a condensed, plain English version of the Young People fact sheet. It provides mothers with information about what the young people in their family might be thinking and feeling; and how their transition to a strong, resilient adulthood can be affected, by being exposed to domestic and family violence.

Other

Adolescent to Parent Abuse

The Adolescent to Parent Abuse fact sheet is designed to provide information to families who are experiencing abuse from their adolescent son or daughter. It enables the reader to identify abusive behaviour and provides a range of professional organisations to assist families to seek external support.

Domestic Violence Goes to Work

The Domestic Violence Goes to Work fact sheet is designed to (a) provide information to employers on how to assist people subjected to domestic violence (predominantly women) in the workplace and best practices for employers to ensure a safe and secure workplace; and to (b) enable an employee to recognise the warning signs when a colleague is being abused at home and how to respond and communicate concerns for their safety.

Signs and Symptoms of Strangulation

Strangulation has only recently been identified as one of the most deadly forms of domestic violence: unconsciousness may occur within seconds and death within minutes. When domestic violence perpetrators strangle their victims, not only is this a form of assault, but it may be an attempted homicide. Strangulation is an ultimate form of power and control, where the perpetrator can demonstrate control over the victim’s next breath. Strangulation can have devastating psychological effects or a potentially fatal outcome.